“Are we lost?”

“No.”

“Well where are we then?”

“I’m not sure, but if we keep going down this track we are bound to hit the road at some point.”

It was a late summer’s afternoon. A simple idea of a ride had inadvertently turned into an adventure. We were lost, no doubt, but we still had a vague idea of where we might be.

After a climb that turned into a push we joined an old farm road that went in the direction we had planned to ride—so onward we rode.

The trail dipped downwards a little too soon for our liking, but with no other option and nothing to worry about, we took advantage of the gentle gradient and easy flowing corners. Following and chasing, I always wish I could ride like her—her balance and feel for the bike is natural, her lines are always perfect. I find myself mesmerised and drawn into following her wheel marks.

We flew around smooth grassy corners, down, down, when abruptly the trail turned uphill. Changing gear, we cruised upwards buoyed by the day, the moment, the company.

After nearly an hour of climbing we topped out on a lonely summit. This is where the doubt set in, and the opening conversation started.

Why has society always judged explorers, adventures and free spirits outside of the norm? Is it an inner fear of moving away from a comfortable existence?

So often in life we know what we are doing, when we have to do it and why. Little is left to doubt; caution is rarely thrown to the wind. Are we, or our lives, lesser for it? I know that exploring a new trail I have little or no knowledge of is a thrill not to be missed. The uncertainty, the excitement of new discovery has a magical effect that lasts all day. In lives that are now connected instantly, information is at hand for all to see—risks are avoided, sanitised, reported and repaired. Coupled with the necessity to instantly tell everyone what you are doing and where you are, it leaves nothing to chance. Have we lost the art of getting lost?

As the sun set we retraced our tracks, climbed a few fences and eventually found the road. With both of us smiling, we rode back to our van as true adventurers and wiser for the experience.

Why has society always judged explorers, adventures and free spirits outside of the norm? Is it an inner fear of moving away from a comfortable existence?

“We need the weird people—the poets, misfits, writers, mystics, painters, musicians, adventurers, explorers, troubadours—for they teach us to see the world through different eyes.” Unashamedly copied and bastardised from Jacob Norby.

Mark Humphreys


the art of getting lost / adam errington
 

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